Same, same, but different: Learning from the students

Young people are often not credited with the ability to deal with complex subjects, and are therefore kept away from them. In a modern age there is a constant feed of information with very little space to process it and consider it from a personal perspective. Young people need the space to challenge not only themselves but also the information they receive and where it is coming from. In doing so they can turn learning and teaching on its head.

For the project “The Ethics and Politics of the Refugee Crisis” we worked with two London schools (Skinners’ Academy and City & Islington College, CANDI), completing the second programme at the start of December 2016. The students at these two schools struck us by showing us how the same process can produce such different results, in the best possible way.

At CANDI we worked with students on developing a performance based on research around media representation of migrants and issues around the refugee crisis. The students discussed and debated these with exceptional awareness and sensitivity, willing and open to have their opinions and knowledge expanded and challenged. They pulled together a powerful performance in a short amount of time, with only 4 sessions available to them. They impressed not only the project partners, but also all those who saw their performance in video format at a large final project event on 2 December at Rich Mix in London, which included academics, NGO’s, charities, and many others.

The teachers, students and parents who saw the performance by the Skinners’ group were also impressed with their maturity in dealing with the topic and the personal development of the students individually. They impressed by making clear that they were continuing conversations and asking questions in their homes, not just in our workshops.

These groups are a great example of how things can be so similar, yet so different. The two groups were hugely different collections of people. While actREAL creates bespoke workshops for each school, a programme within any particular academic project will deal with a specific topic. Each programme is broadly the same in how it is set up and its final aims. Despite this, however, it is entirely impossible to say that any group of students has been the same. Each group has different dynamics, different awareness of the subject at hand, different levels of engagement and willingness. Each group approaches workshops differently and they always produce a very unique performance, reflective of them.

When young people present a new perspective on information they receive, having been allowed to explore it personally and taking charge of its new form, they are able to take on a variety of challenges: they challenge themselves to know more information and to possibly unlearn what had come before. For example, a student from CANDI stated at the final event “Everything I’d heard about refugees before this was negative”. It gives them the opportunity to decide where they sit, at that moment, on a topic, to challenge the academics that provided the source material by presenting a new way of looking at it, and to develop an emotional bond with the material. In this process the students also positively challenge academics and us as they make unexpected choices, challenging the information itself by applying their own circumstances and realities to it to try to make sense of it. Importantly, they also challenge what it is to learn and teach, as they take on both roles themselves by immersing themselves, their intellect and their emotions into a topic and presenting it to others in turn, no doubt, teaching the spectator a thing or two.

(All images by Jahan Khan)

By: Ida Persson

Same, same, but different: Learning from the students

Improve the migration debate, engage young minds

Michael Rosen recently emphasized the importance of introducing the immigration debate to young people as a way to combat racism in society, with particular focus on the rise in racist incidents after the EU referendum. He suggested that we should urge schools to start conversations about the benefits of migration and the historical context to current migration attitudes. (Dear Nicky Morgan: this is how to deal with post-Brexit racism, The Guardian)

We entirely agree. This is why actREAL works with schools to engage young people with complex social and political issues, focusing to date mainly on migration. Using theatre and other art forms allows discussion within schools about migration, exploring the topic from different angles (such as the migration crisis, or the experiences of undocumented migrant children), to open up an honest, personal and reflective debate around how migration plays a part in the every day lives of students and their communities.

Migration is always topical because it is constant, and a spotlight has (again) been shone on it throughout the EU referendum campaigns and their aftermath. Throughout the referendum campaigns migration was a recurrent theme. “Less immigration”, “stopping people from coming”, “controlling numbers” were (and still are) common phrases. Concerns were raised about the EU and world immigration, and often the two were conflated. There also seemed to be a lack of in-depth, genuine understanding of the realities of migration to Britain and its consequences.

Migration has simultaneously shaped British society and been the cause for social tensions. It is therefore important that the immigration debate does not exist in a vacuum, as this inevitably leads to confusion and unhelpful generalizations. It should be a topic for discussion, one that can lead to empathy and understanding of personal stories and real life perspectives. What it should not be is a political game piece leading to manipulation and misunderstanding by interested parties.

Schools are obliged by Ofsted to find opportunities to promote British Values. This is defined in part as “mutual respect and tolerance for those with different faiths and beliefs”. Schools are therefore well placed to engage constructively in this debate. They are also required to adhere to the PREVENT strategy, to combat radicalization. The latter has been criticized for closing down free speech and debate within schools.

Today’s students will play an important and influential role in the shaping of our future society. They need to understand and relate to differences and conflicting needs and demands by different players within the debate. This can best be done through a complete, comprehensive and holistic engagement with the topic, and in a way that satisfies the many requirements and pressures that schools already face.

actREAL strives to generate empathy with, and understanding of, the various lived realities of migration in young people. In the process we develop life skills that help young people to better navigate and critically assess this multi-faceted debate as they encounter it in their everyday. Working towards finding our similarities, sharing experiences with our neighbours, and understanding the myriad of different perspectives goes a long way to combating hatred, blame and misunderstanding.

Below is an example of a poem written by a 15 year old student who recently worked with actREAL. It demonstrates the sophistication, creativity and insight young people are capable of when difficult subjects are introduced to them in a stimulating and engaging fashion. We should encourage them.

I’m just another migration statistic (reprinted with permission).

I’m just another migration statistic,
One of the thousands, a number, no characteristic,
Just one of that huge number, another benefit scrounger,
Just laying in a flat, like a lazy lounger,
It’s not like I’m in desperate need,
I guess it’d damage your economy, too many to feed,
You think we come and drain your economy,
It’s as if unfair is your policy,
Leaving to cross the border, leave a country that is war torn,
Making opportunity broader, in the boat just a wrapped up new born,
We don’t come to steal your wealth and property,
We just have nothing and are in desperate poverty,
We have come for a safe life, we are in danger back home,
We’d give you our best work , nothing we can give that we own,
I’m just another migration statistic,
One of the thousands, a number, no characteristic,
You haven’t lived in the places we’ve been
gone through the devastation we’ve grieved and seen
Traumatised, broken, it’s all devastation,
Risking their life for a safer nation,
Seeking only safety and happiness,
Wanting to leave behind the home stress,
They’re worked up, mind is a mess,
All they want is safety, why do they deserve less?
But the border isn’t just a physical country definition,
Citizens’ xenophobia is a built in mental position,
Yeah the country is full,
But their stomachs aren’t full,
And our heads are full of the propaganda its awful,
Getting indoctrinated by the ill educated system
Dig deeper and learn into the story
Forget yourself, your pride and glory
I’m just another migration statistic,
One of the thousands, a number, no characteristic
– Kyle Eldridge

Improve the migration debate, engage young minds

Welcome to actREAL!

 

We are thrilled to launch our new website and blog!

This blog will keep you updated on our projects, thoughts and discoveries! The first official blog will be posted soon. In the meantime, why not have a look through the website and see if what we do is for you?

Welcome to actREAL where academia, engagement, personal feeling, and individual development cross paths!

Speak soon!

Ida and Vanessa (the ones who run actREAL!)

Welcome to actREAL!